Bugs, Drugs and the Amazing Race

@ Science & Technology

Wonder why you keep hearing about so many new infectious diseases? How do we manage them? Come explore the perpetual arms race between humans and microbes as we both battle for survival in our modern world.

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April 9, 2013 at 1:11 pm


Alanna Watt: What is brain assembly?

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This Freaky Friday explores the fascinating field of brain development (assembly) and what happens when it goes wrong, in particular in the spinocerebellar ataxia SCA6.

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April 27, 2012 at 4:59 pm


The future of Quantum Mechanics

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By Bill Coish (Physics, McGill). How can we realistically use large scale quantum mechanical effects to our advantage? Check out these interviews in Nature and on CBC Radio 1 where Dr. Coish talks about quantum information science.

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March 5, 2012 at 12:44 pm


Nature or Nurture: Do genes actually determine your personality?

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By Roberta Palmour (Genetics, McGill). How do specific personality traits themselves predispose to particular types of mental illness? Listen to Roberta Palmour’s interview on CBC about personality disorders and her work with monkeys’ personality traits.

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February 28, 2012 at 6:09 pm


Oxytocin me, baby — the truth about the so-called love hormone

@ Science & Technology

By Jennifer A. Bartz (Psychology, McGill). Oxytocin is widely known as the “love hormone” released during birth and breastfeeding to bond a mother and child, but it’s released other times, too. Like during an orgasm. Or a romantic date. Oxytocin supposedly overflows us with positive feelings about one another. Or does it?

Read more about Dr. Bartz work with oxytocin in this Time Magazine report. Tune into the CBC interview with Dr. Bartz on Freaky Sunday, Feb. 5, that explains how oxytocin is critical in mammalian pair-bonding.

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February 28, 2012 at 6:05 pm


The misunderstanding of dinosaurs

@ Science & Technology

By Emily Bamforth (Ph.D. candidate, Redpath Museum and Biology, McGill). Is a Pterodactyl really a dinosaur? Could ‘Jurassic Park’ actually happen? Come and find what you may not have known about society’s favorite prehistorical creatures. Check out this interview on CBC Radio 1

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February 28, 2012 at 5:59 pm


Radiation as a weapon of mass benefaction

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The applications of radiation are as wide as the myths surrounding it. In this lecture, Arman Sarfehnia will discuss what radiation is, and look at a brief history of radiation, how it was discovered and what role it has played in our lives. The applications of radiation in diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology will be discussed, and a brief cost-benefit analysis for medical applications will be presented.

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April 14, 2011 at 11:33 am


The Aging Process — Myths and Realities

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What is aging? Recent animal studies have shown that clioquinol — an 80-year-old drug once used to treat diarrhea and other gastrointestinal disorders — can reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. According to Dr. Siegfried Hekimi, clioquinol acts irectly on a protein called CLK-1, often informally called “clock-1,” and might slow down the aging process. Learn about this anti-aging medication and the gut realities about the process of getting old.

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April 14, 2011 at 11:31 am


Is love a big equilateral triangle?

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McGill Psychology prof John Lydon delivers a Freaky Friday lecture on the science of close relationships: what are the physiological and psychological mechanisms that keep us in “love” ?

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February 16, 2011 at 3:54 pm


Birds, brains, and songs

@ Science & Technology

Not only do some birds sing but they sing cleverly. Female birds prefer males that sing ‘prettier songs’, but sometimes they have a strange definition of ‘pretty’. Neeltje Boogert discusses some amazing facts about animal communication.

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February 16, 2011 at 3:52 pm